Preparing for Palm Sunday
A man weaves a palm frond in Quiapo, Manila on Saturday, April 12, day before Palm Sunday. Catholics use palm fronds in observance of the Palm Sunday, commemorating the triumphant arrival of Jesus Christ into Jerusalem. Palm Sunday also marks the start of the Holy Week according to the Roman Catholic calendar.

Preparing for Palm Sunday

A man weaves a palm frond in Quiapo, Manila on Saturday, April 12, day before Palm Sunday. Catholics use palm fronds in observance of the Palm Sunday, commemorating the triumphant arrival of Jesus Christ into Jerusalem. Palm Sunday also marks the start of the Holy Week according to the Roman Catholic calendar.

Protest against China’s ‘harassment’
Filipino activists stage an anti-China protest in front of the Chinese Consular office in Manila’s financial district of Makati City on Wednesday, April 2. Members of the left group, Akbayan Party-list expressed their indignation over China’s latest harassment of Philippine vessel near Ayungin Shoal in the West Philippine Sea last March 29.

Protest against China’s ‘harassment’

Filipino activists stage an anti-China protest in front of the Chinese Consular office in Manila’s financial district of Makati City on Wednesday, April 2. Members of the left group, Akbayan Party-list expressed their indignation over China’s latest harassment of Philippine vessel near Ayungin Shoal in the West Philippine Sea last March 29.

The Estero
MANILA, Philippines (2014) - The city of Manila lies in a body of waters, one of which is the estero. These narrow streams have become a place of settlement to many Manileño families; even some have already lived their whole lives in the esteros. For them, the estero means life.
But as time has gone by, some inhabitants might have seemed to forget to treasure the gift of life they got from nature. Their rubbish were not properly disposed transforming the whole estero their huge trash bin. It becomes a stream of filth.
The garbage blocking the esteros brings floods and diseases to the community.
These could risk the lives of the inhabitants.
In 2009, Tropical Storm Ondoy made the worst flooding Manila experienced. Leaving the areas of the esteros, especially Estero de Paco, submerged in floodwaters. Several residents of that community were forced to evacuate. Some left with fear and traumatized with the incident.
The storm’s aftermath has made the government to expedite their efforts to rehabilitate the polluted waters of Manila esteros. This clean up will lessen the flooding. The government is also doing an effort to educate the estero inhabitants of proper waste disposal.
The life that once the estero residents knew has becoming more of a threat to them if they still continue to disrespect nature.  The estero means life but if not treated well it could also means death.

The Estero

MANILA, Philippines (2014) - The city of Manila lies in a body of waters, one of which is the estero. These narrow streams have become a place of settlement to many Manileño families; even some have already lived their whole lives in the esteros. For them, the estero means life.

But as time has gone by, some inhabitants might have seemed to forget to treasure the gift of life they got from nature. Their rubbish were not properly disposed transforming the whole estero their huge trash bin. It becomes a stream of filth.

The garbage blocking the esteros brings floods and diseases to the community.

These could risk the lives of the inhabitants.

In 2009, Tropical Storm Ondoy made the worst flooding Manila experienced. Leaving the areas of the esteros, especially Estero de Paco, submerged in floodwaters. Several residents of that community were forced to evacuate. Some left with fear and traumatized with the incident.

The storm’s aftermath has made the government to expedite their efforts to rehabilitate the polluted waters of Manila esteros. This clean up will lessen the flooding. The government is also doing an effort to educate the estero inhabitants of proper waste disposal.

The life that once the estero residents knew has becoming more of a threat to them if they still continue to disrespect nature.  The estero means life but if not treated well it could also means death.

The Colors of Caracol
Students dressed in their colorful nature-inspired costumes take part in the celebration of the Caracol Festival 2014 in Makati City, business district of Manila, Philippines on Sunday, February 23. The festival is the city administation’s effort to create awareness on the preservation of environment and natural resources in the country.

The Colors of Caracol

Students dressed in their colorful nature-inspired costumes take part in the celebration of the Caracol Festival 2014 in Makati City, business district of Manila, Philippines on Sunday, February 23. The festival is the city administation’s effort to create awareness on the preservation of environment and natural resources in the country.

The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.
The Nazarene Devotion
“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014) - An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.
 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.
 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.
 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.
 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.

The Nazarene Devotion

“Faith is about doing. You are how you act, not just how you believe.” - Mitch Alboom

Manila, Philippines (2014)An eerie atmosphere greeted me as I arrived 7 in the morning at the Quirino Grandstand to venerate the centuries old image of the Black Nazarene. Thousands of Nazarene devotees in maroon and yellow shirts nearly covered the entire area of the Grandstand, which some have probably camped out overnight just for this annual religious event celebrated every January 9. Every year, the event draws millions of devotees to join in the annual celebration of the feast. Where devotees join the procession in barefoot as a sacrifice.

 A mass was held led by Manila Archbishop Luis Antonio Cardinal Tagle before they started the annual “Traslacion”, or grand procession of the Black Nazarene back to the Minor Basilica of the Black Nazarene (Quiapo Church). But the mass was interrupted when some devotees broke the barriers and climbed the stage to hold the Black Nazarene image. Archbishop stopped the mass when security officers were unable to control the crowd who eagerly wanted the Black Nazarene image transferred on its “Andas” (carriage). This causes a delay to start the procession. Devotees started to wave their white towels and chant a monotonous hypnotic phrase, “Isakay ang Poong Nazareno” (“Carry the Lord Nazarene”) while waiting for the start of the procession. As soon as the religious image was transferred to the majestic carriage, the procession had started.

 The carriage surrounded by thousands devotees, swept slowly like driftwood in an open sea. Devotees jostle with each other just to climb the carriage and touch the dark image of Jesus Christ. Even experienced devotees find it hard to reach the carriage in a strong current of a whirlpool of devotees. So others were further away just contented waving and hurling their towels to marshals in the carriage to wipe the religious image. It is believed that those who take a glimpse or touch the miraculous image of Christ carrying the cross grants their wishes and brings them good fortune.

 Many non-believers still consider this Catholic tradition as a mere fanaticism and idolatry.

 But for those thousands of barefooted devotees who have sacrificed participating in the annual Traslacion, the feast of the Black Nazarene is a celebration of gratitude of all the blessings they have received in the past and to honor Christ as their one true lord.