Father and Son
JR and his son Julius were among the many families that were affected by super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Santa Fe, Bantayan Island in Cebu on November last year. The typhoon brought ravage, which destroyed the houses of the residents and also wrecked the boats of some fisherfolks in the island. Although there are already efforts from the government and other NGO’s providing help to the affected families by building new houses and boats, many are still temporarily sheltered in tents or makeshift houses. 

Father and Son

JR and his son Julius were among the many families that were affected by super typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) in Santa Fe, Bantayan Island in Cebu on November last year. The typhoon brought ravage, which destroyed the houses of the residents and also wrecked the boats of some fisherfolks in the island. Although there are already efforts from the government and other NGO’s providing help to the affected families by building new houses and boats, many are still temporarily sheltered in tents or makeshift houses. 

Hanging on the Edge
A delicate pinkish bud with morning dews gently rests on the sharp edge of a leaf at a garden inside the famous Intramuros in Manila. 
I took this photo 2 years ago while I was still attending a basic course in Photography. It was early morning that I had  to make a quick walk  to search for potential subject for our assignment before I went to school. Several minutes later of walking around the garden near the school, I saw something that caught my interest. It was a bud gently resting on the edge of a leaf.  The vibrant complimentary colors of the scene fascinates me. I guess this was a rare opportunity for me. So I took my camera, framed the scene well and took the shot.

Hanging on the Edge

A delicate pinkish bud with morning dews gently rests on the sharp edge of a leaf at a garden inside the famous Intramuros in Manila. 

I took this photo 2 years ago while I was still attending a basic course in Photography. It was early morning that I had  to make a quick walk  to search for potential subject for our assignment before I went to school. Several minutes later of walking around the garden near the school, I saw something that caught my interest. It was a bud gently resting on the edge of a leaf.  The vibrant complimentary colors of the scene fascinates me. I guess this was a rare opportunity for me. So I took my camera, framed the scene well and took the shot.

Getting Inked and rejected
A tattoo artist  applies a “Dream Catcher” tattoo at his client’s back. Tattoos have become more popular in today’s society.
Photo taken on September 2013.

I’ve had my first tattoo a year and a half now. It started with just a small piece, it was an “Eye of Providence” or the All-Seeing Eye design inked on the upper part of my left leg. It wasn’t really my plan to have a tattoo that time. I just got interested when a tattoo artist and another buddy had a tattoo session at my place. So I decided to have one. The experience is memorable. The pain is tolerable and somehow your skin gets numb to the needles as the artist applies the tattoo. I had fun. 
Since I got my first tattoo I became more fond of it and I keep on asking for more from my friend. My tattoo have grown on my leg since my first, almost covering it up. 
Tattoos have become more popular in todays society. It is now more accepted by the norm. An inked person has now have the chance to land for a job.
But there are still companies that have a certain tattoo policy. 
Like what I have experienced recently.
I was just a step away from a dream job as a photographer on board that I’ve always wanted to do but the employer rejected me when she found out that I have a large tattoo on my left leg. I didn’t get the job even she liked my sample works. She told me if it wasn’t for the company’s policy she probably hire me. There should no visible tattoos on employees. The employer also advised me that we may wear shorts sometimes in our work. So my tattoo on my left leg will still be “visible” , I tried convincing her that I will have my tattoo covered during working hours just for me to get hired but she left me no option. 
The company’s tattoo policy was not clearly stated to me. But I guess they just want to present their employees “professionally” to their clients/guests. 
I just  wished that this company will give more chance to hire tattooed talents. It was frustrating but I am not losing hope. Off course, there are still companies that are willing to hire a tattooed guy like me. I will just have to look for them and try again my luck. Frankly, you might also agree that having tattoos won’t really affect someone else’s performance and the quality of his works.
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Getting Inked and rejected

A tattoo artist  applies a “Dream Catcher” tattoo at his client’s back. Tattoos have become more popular in today’s society.

Photo taken on September 2013.

I’ve had my first tattoo a year and a half now. It started with just a small piece, it was an “Eye of Providence” or the All-Seeing Eye design inked on the upper part of my left leg. It wasn’t really my plan to have a tattoo that time. I just got interested when a tattoo artist and another buddy had a tattoo session at my place. So I decided to have one. The experience is memorable. The pain is tolerable and somehow your skin gets numb to the needles as the artist applies the tattoo. I had fun. 

Since I got my first tattoo I became more fond of it and I keep on asking for more from my friend. My tattoo have grown on my leg since my first, almost covering it up. 

Tattoos have become more popular in todays society. It is now more accepted by the norm. An inked person has now have the chance to land for a job.

But there are still companies that have a certain tattoo policy. 

Like what I have experienced recently.

I was just a step away from a dream job as a photographer on board that I’ve always wanted to do but the employer rejected me when she found out that I have a large tattoo on my left leg. I didn’t get the job even she liked my sample works. She told me if it wasn’t for the company’s policy she probably hire me. There should no visible tattoos on employees. The employer also advised me that we may wear shorts sometimes in our work. So my tattoo on my left leg will still be “visible” , I tried convincing her that I will have my tattoo covered during working hours just for me to get hired but she left me no option. 

The company’s tattoo policy was not clearly stated to me. But I guess they just want to present their employees “professionally” to their clients/guests. 

I just  wished that this company will give more chance to hire tattooed talents. It was frustrating but I am not losing hope. Off course, there are still companies that are willing to hire a tattooed guy like me. I will just have to look for them and try again my luck. Frankly, you might also agree that having tattoos won’t really affect someone else’s performance and the quality of his works.

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Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.
Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga
Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.
 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.
 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.
 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.
 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.

Cross and Whip: The Bloody Ritual in Pampanga

Pampanga, Philippines (2014) - The humble village of Lourdes in Angeles City, is just one of the villages in Pampanga where penitents engaged in an extreme bloody form of ritual, which re-enacts the sufferings and crucifixion of Jesus Christ during Good Friday.

 This bizarre practice has attracted both local and foreign tourists were they swarmed these villages to see this bloody religious ritual. Even street vendors did not let this tradition passed, they took the opportunity to install booths to sell food, refreshments, and even miniature whips as souvenirs.

 Penitents are locally known as “magdarame”, lashed their own backs with makeshift bamboo whips, called burilyos, while others carry a large wooden cross on their backs. Blood splattered everywhere as they continue to march the streets of the village under the scorching sun.

 Passion play was also performed, wherein an actor, portraying Christ, was dragged on the streets by men costumed as “Centurions” and eventually he was nailed on the cross on top of a man-made Cavalry in the village.

 Despite of Catholic church leaders’ rejection on this violent forms of penitence, devotees still believe and continue to practice this belief to atone their sins, ask for miracles, give thanks to their blessings from God, and just to fulfill their religious vows.

Bloody Rituals
A hooded penitent lies on ground as he takes part in a religious rites during the observance of Good Friday in Angeles City, Pampanga on April 18, 2014. Despite Catholic leaders’ rejection of this gory act, many Filipino devotees still engaged in self-penitence like flagellations and crucifixion for the atonement of their sins and fulfillment of their religious vows. 

Bloody Rituals

A hooded penitent lies on ground as he takes part in a religious rites during the observance of Good Friday in Angeles City, Pampanga on April 18, 2014. Despite Catholic leaders’ rejection of this gory act, many Filipino devotees still engaged in self-penitence like flagellations and crucifixion for the atonement of their sins and fulfillment of their religious vows.